Indiana Soldiers’ and Sailors’ Children’s Home

My first job right out of grad school was writing maintenance and treatment plans for the historic buildings on the Indiana Soliders’ and Sailors’ Children’s Home campus. Nestled in the rolling hills of northern Rush County, Indiana, the Indiana Soldiers’ and Sailors’ Children’s Home served thousands of veterans’ children over its 154-year history. Founded in 1865 as a post-Civil War facility, the Home originally provided care to the orphans of Indiana’s Civil War soldiers. Closed by the State of Indiana in 2009, the Home evolved from ten orphans to 1,010 children during its peak attendance in 1935. The campus includes 53 buildings and was listed on the National Register of Historic Places on December 20, 2011. The architecture on the campus weaves from Romanesque Revival to Art Deco and Craftsman to the Modern movement. Since I spent so much of my early professional career studying this lovely campus, I felt it only appropriate to share some photos from the Home for a #TBT post. Enjoy!

4 Comments

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  1. Gorgeous! And what a fun job!!

  2. Those dormitory buildings! So good looking! They remind me of the houses along 56th St. at Fort Ben, or the houses on US 40 in the Putnamville Correctional Facility.

    • The architect of all the dormitories was McGuire and Shook. They were designed to look like homes, to give the students some semblance of home life! Although most of them have been updated on the interior, they retain great features like fireplaces and wood trim, as you’d see in a private home of the era!

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